“Amu” told price of November 1984 amnesia, India didn’t listen; suffers

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Shonali Bose’s Amu -perhaps the only movie with the theme of November 1984 told us the truth of Delhi 1984 that forgetfulness is not a good human trait nor a good political philosophy.  Gujarat followed and much more. Is anyone listening, even now?

If you admire bold cinema and art that provokes you into thinking your role as a human being in the face of inhumanity and cruelty, do watch Shonali Bose’s Amu -perhaps the only movie with the theme of November 1984. Amu told us the truth of Delhi 1984 that forgetfulness is not a good human trait nor a good political philosophy.  Gujarat followed and much more. Is anyone listening, even now?

“Amu” is perhaps the only Hindi movie on the November 1984 anti-Sikh carnage. It was released in very few cinema halls across the country. WSN editor Jagmohan Singh travelled all the way to Delhi from Ludhiana with his young artist son to see the moview. There were quite a few who liked it for its its straightforward truthfulness and those who wanted the inglorious chapter to be forgotten, disliked the movie.e.

Having lived through the experience I can say this film is a MUST. 

In this debut film, journalist Shonali Bose through the character of Amu -the girl child of a Sikh family, brought up in a Bengali family, settled in the US but who wants to know her roots, tells the viewer that forgetting is not the solution, learning from it is.

Reviewing “Amu”, The New York Times had said, “this feature film wears its political heart on its sleeve and is unafraid to tackle the big topics: identity, history, truth, injustice.”

As a Sikh-American, I was personally and profoundly affected by the film. It is a brave film told in a beautiful way bringing out the humanity behind the tragedy. It gave me strength, it made me weep, it made me want to shout out from the rooftops: Everyone watch Amu! 

The role of activist-politician Brinda Karat is a treat to watch. Her sincerity on screen and in real life and the work that she did in the immediate aftermath of November 1984 as a volunteer of the Nagrik Ekta Manch, will see Sikhs always indebted to her, as we shall be to Shonali Bose for immortalising the events of the carnage which the Indian state wants the Sikhs to forget.

In case you have not yet seen the movie, see it here. A downloaded version is available on YouTube. You may see an original version on Netflix of Amazon Prime Video too.  Should you still be nitpicking, read on:

What the artists, critics and activists say? Why you must watch AMU?

Having lived through the experience I can say this film is a MUST.
Khushwant Singh

Brilliant and courageous. A must see.
Mira Nair -Director, The Namesake, Monsoon Wedding, Salaam Bombay

Most significant Indian film of recent years.
Z magazine

Amu combines an untold history with the magic of fiction in a chilling story that is all too familiar to Sikhs around the world. Bose’s depiction has brought Sikh suffering to the global stage. The film is a reminder of the true meaning of Sikhi.
Neha Singh Gohil, Sikhchic

Hard-hitting, incisive and entertaining.
Verve Magazine

Every Sikh, indeed every human being should see Amu. It compellingly tells the forgotten story of state-organized anti-Sikh violence in 1984.
Amardeep Singh, Executive Director, Sikh Coalition.

Powerful -a film-maker to watch.
LA Weekly

Awesome, creative, moving and relevant.
Harinder Singh, Executive Director, Sikh Research Institute

Heartwrenching -made more powerful by the fact that the Indian government tried very hard to suppress the story.
NY Magazine

“Amu calls for an end to genocidal killings in India, for the rule of law over the rule of men.”
Jaskaran Kaur, Co-Director, Ensaaf

Boldly rips away a tapestry of lies and cover ups a first rate detective story.
Hollywood Reporter

A bold and heartrending film, extremely well made and deeply moving. It’s an important film as it is very relevant to our times.
Aamir Khan, Actor.

As a Sikh-American, I was personally and profoundly affected by the film. It is a brave film told in a beautiful way bringing out the humanity behind the tragedy. It gave me strength, it made me weep, it made me want to shout out from the rooftops: Everyone watch Amu!
Geetanjali Dhillon; Executive VP, Jaman.com

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I absolutely loved Amu. A thoughtful and important film with a universal theme. I was profoundly affected by it.
Deepa Mehta -Director, Water, Fire

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